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u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. >> we can reduce that by well over a $100 billion a year. >> the range of new threats include cyber threats, bio threats, and a host of non-state actors. >> how do you do all of this on the budgets we have for the armed forces given the debt situation we have in our own country? >> that's going to be, i think, in many ways the biggest debate within the military, if not, in society at large. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so inter-connected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions i
to talk about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really t
to fishermen about the increasing dangers of working in disputed waters. >> u.s. president barack obama says he still hopes congress can reach agreement to avoid the so- called fiscal cliff. obama met congressional leaders at the white house on friday to discuss a deal. he said the talks were constructive, but did issue a warning on behalf of the american people, demanding congress take action. >> america wonders why it is that in this town, for some reason, you cannot get stuff done in an organized time table, where everything has to wait till the last minute. we are now of the last minute. in the american people are not going to have any patients for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. >> the president said he was modestly optimistic that the january 1 deadline for the fiscal cliff could be averted, but that is contingent on a vote in the senate on a compromise bill, and that will have to get an up or down vote. there is a majority for that, with some tax increases for upper-income people. the question is what level would be acceptable to republicans. more crucial to that is, w
at the last great senate. but first, the nonpartisan stimson center recently released a report, a new u.s. defense strategy for a new era that outlines four approaches for cutting defense spending but maintaining capability. stimson's co-founder barry blechman spearheaded the study. the report has become a must- read for anyone involved in the coming defense review or budget planning team. barry, welcome to the team. >> thank you, vag go. >> congratulations for your slot on the defense news top 100 most influential people. >> that was the biggest thrill of the year. >> so let's start off with the report. each report begins with assumptions about threats to the united states to be facing and what's going to be needed to meet them what. are those threats and what's the right strategy to address those threats as cost efficiently as possible? >> the group was more optimistic than many people in looking at the world. they see russia as a country that doesn't pose any threats now and really won't, can't for many years. they see china as a potential threat in the future but recognize we have com
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
of the salvation army and changing the role in the u.s.. islamic the salvation army which many people don't realize is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside of department stores in the christmas season it's what they call the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas especially impoverished areas would have parades' and make lots of malaise the symbols trying to attract especially the urban poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the cases from t
think it was on friday -- in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might have learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent yes, but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is in full existential mode. they're extremely paranoid. they believe that opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti- democratic and are out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimately elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's why essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is -- and brotherhood leaders actually told me this -- is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti- democratic, but the normal rules of politics are suspended until future notice because we are in this fundamental turning point, and this is what we have to do.
weeks the u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the united states changed course, and so at that meeting, truman meets molotov -- first meet with advisers and they're divided. marshall, leahy, are all telling him don't break with the soviets. said to the secretary of war and said, the soviets have a much better understand of their open security, especially around poland, than we do. >> stepping back from the details, do you think it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each of whom had, i think, it's fair to say, an empire, one formal, one a little more informal, because the soviets had different, smaller states under their control, and going to keep control of the baltic states and moving into eastern europe. was it realistic for these two powers, who are very different, to really get along for very long or were they really destined to have a cold war and luckily never really had a hot war except through proxies. so details are important, an
have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
. although the u.s. could extend its nuclear umbrella to other nations and there so that obviates that need, but still isn't deterrent working through the cold war something that can also be applied to iran or a number of other nuclear regimes? >> the short answer is question. deterrents can work and of course it did work. it becomes harder many on many as compared with one-on-one. the u.s. and the soviet union became quite experienced in how to handle mutually assured destruction if you like. or mutual deterrents. when you have a number of -- many nations butting up against each other physically essentially, and with much less experience in handling the issue of deterrents, i think the risks become higher. and if as you suggest proliferation is likely to become more widespread, if iran actually gets nuclear capability, i think the risks are very high. i'm rather pessimistic because it does seem to me that one way or another, a local nuclear war could break out and has a fairly high probability of breaking out. and when it happens, if it happens, the destruction will be very great. i'm a --
and also argue their case to the american people from here at the u.s. capitol. but unified they say ultimately they will come back sunday afternoon and be available sunday evening for possible votes. votes. that is does 30 as we get mighty close to the fiscal cliff. harris? >> harris: mike emanuel thank you very much. more coming up on the get-together tomorrow at the white house whether it will be or not to try to work out a solution. that is coming up at the bottom of the hour. >>> the stubborn winter storm sticking around across much of the nation's eastern half. the same weather system that slammed the south and dumped know snow on the midwest bringing misery to the northeast and new england. causing new trouble for post holiday travelers. an american airlines plane ended up stranded on a snow. >> tarmac in pittsburgh. just outside new york city a southwest jet got stuck in the mud after skidding off the runway. in some of the hardest hit area the roads are even worse. >> i lost count of number of cars in the ditch. a jackknifed tractor trailer and a horse trailer turned over. >
'll make a couple of suggestions. you might try picturing a burning u.s. warship at pearl harbor. or if you'd rather do a happier image, how about a man kissing a woman, leaning and kissing a woman in times square in new york on the third day. or maybe you prefer politics. how about churchville, stalin and roosevelt a filter sitting down together. maybe that image. or maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese americans during the war. so what are you pi
and certain stories hit. this was the genesis for the book. i saw how the u.s. military particularly the air force defeated geography in the balkans. it turns out the army did well despite of, and the successful conclusion to the war in bosnia and kosovo were a factor in allowing nato to expand to the black sea although nobody really wrote to that. and what is really the success of the balkans and a panel and we were bloodied to bits in somalia that made people think we can do anything. and that's when geography got its revenge in the mountains and the desert sahara and afghanistan because the transformative moment for me i was embedded with the first battalion of the marine. en and coo eight in march of 2004 we were making an overland journey with several hundred miles to fallujah and it wasn't yet on the news, the battle of fallujah was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah and all we did this transport one marine battalion from one place to another, it wasn't particularly dangerous, but the statistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water models, tool kits,
the overall agreement, so the u.s. policy towards the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's a big meeting on april 23rd on april april 23rd the united states had changed course so at that meeting first teammates with his advisers one-fifth within marshall, leahy telling him they are grateful to the soviets and since the secretary of war understood the soviets have a much better understanding to their own security especially around poland than we do. >> stepping back from those details, do you think that it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each to ochre and had i think was fair to say the entire one for all because the soviets obviously have their own different smaller states under the control and fifth. whether the two powers were in there is the logical bases to get along for very long. of course it never would have happened, but arguably stabenow as you know himself who is the head of the communist party told the communists and 45 get ready for the class war to continue in effect. don't believe the peaceful coexistence
. in it they argue that u.s. leaders must chart a course for the future by first facing what they call the country's troubling history of drifting further away from its democratic traditions. >> host: hello peter and oliver. i've taught with peter at american university. let me start by having both of you talk about the theme of this and how you wrote it? >> guest: i was invited in 1996 to go to this class at american university researching oliver storms america and one of the classes i was very popular. i went very impressed with it and the range of students and afterwards peter suggested that there was a great story about the atomic him in the atomic bomb always fascinated me because i was born the year after it was dropped and it was in new york city, the center of the world and my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scientist of the 30s and ab
, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iran over the persian gulf. it was undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's so
the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. detention policy in the war on terrorism, the government's ability to detain without trial individuals suspected of involvement in terrorism, it seems that the one that dominates all others is the extent to which future u.s. to some policy will and should be subject to judicial review. why is this not settled? well, if you the citizens and non-citizens, i think it's both sold and moved that these dissensions will be subject to review, settled because we have a series of cases in the early part of the last decade or the courts actually rejected arguments offered by the bush and restoration that such cases raised a political question settled because these individuals clearly have rights of the constitution including the right tit review and neat because dss has not picked up anyone hitting this category and subject -- subjected them to end of military tension says it doesn't three. there have only been three cases in custody their detention in austin years now, and i think that's partly going to stay for a while. it settled at
for calling. a live picture of the u.s. capitol. 7:23 in washington. some heavy rain and perhaps some snow. a. when terry mix are expecting in town. we mention that because the president is heading back into town. the senate and white house -- the senate and house are due back tomorrow. this is an politico. there is another piece of this morning that says the house member elect is also interested in the peak in the seat -- adapter the seat. springfield, va., lewis, an independent. caller: good morning. you could consider me a little bit pessimistic. i am actually looking at it as realistically as possible. i have a degree in macroeconomics. i believe that they all should be -- we should institute term limits on all of them. maybe a six-year term limit. they're all thinking of reelection. host: both sides? caller: yes. they are thinking about re- election with the country is almost $70 trillion in debt. -- $17 trillion. people and businesses are giving out payouts because taxes are going up on everyone. it does not matter -- there are too many taxes going up. payroll taxes going up. we do not
in from all over the world but also the u.s. products meant to sell overseas. >> so it's not just the local port area affected by the strike but the entire region and the state. going nationally as well. >> from boston to houston, these ports represent hundreds of billions of dollars worth of consumer goods that flow for distribution thousands of miles inland. thanks to both sides reaching a nearly last-minute agreement, none will see the picket signs sunday. >> economist worried if we do go off the fiscal cliff, it's now averted strike would have combined for a deadly one-two punch to the u.s. economy. now the overall deal is at 100% signed off on by februar february 6, then we are right back to where we were this morning and again the national retail federation and the florida governor rick scott will be urging president obama to prevent a strike invoking the tap partly act and something not done since president george w. bush did it in 2002. back to you. >> doug: phil keating in miami. the so-called milk cliff that would also kick in to effect the lawmakers can't avoid the fisc
, thanks very much. we're looking by the way on left-hand side of your screen live on the floor of the u.s. senate. don't you know, not much happening there. patti ann: all right. republican congressman louie gohmert is responding to those comments from senator reid that we just heard, firing back at accusations that republicans are refusing to compromise. let's listen. >> i can totally sympathize with reid's remark that he can not imagine our consciences in the house because you would have to have one to imagine ours. and he has shown repeatedly, over three years of no budget? come on. the guy has to have no conscience or he would have been embarrassed and given up leadership on his own if he had any conscience whatsoever. we have passed a bill to deal with the fiscal cliff. harry reid is becoming the ultimate cliff diver here by saying we're not going to even let our house, the senate house function. we're going to dive off the cliff and blame the republicans at every ledge down the way. gregg: cliff diving a new political sport. and senator lindsey graham also speaking out suggesting th
" starts right now. maybe. >> the u.s. and a potentially devastating blow. a temporary deal is reached to stop a looming strike at american courts for now. good to see you. welcome to "america live", i am gregg jarrett. heather: and i am heather. megyn kelly is off today. it looks like they will have 30 days to come up with a plan to avert a strike to put many americans out of the work. we will bring them on the story as we get get the details. the first time in developing this hour we are awaiting a high-stakes meeting at the white house between president obama and congressional leaders on the fiscal crisis. the talks are a last-ditch effort to avoid spending cuts and tax hikes from 90% of american households. mike emanuel is live on capitol hill where all the action is taking place. is there a lot of action? there is a lot of buzz on capitol hill. mitch mcconnell, who will be attending a white house meeting told us a few moments ago that we are always the running out of time. chairman max baucus, the democrat says that he thinks this will fiscal cliff matter comes down as one white h
service members remained. he says he remembers being on the deck of the u.s.s. honolulu like it was yesterday. >> when i got there i had the cover off one of the 50 caliber machine guns. the other was about halfway off and a torpedo went by, the torpedo heading for ship row. i thought at the time that this is really a good mock thing like that. i pull the cover off the rest of the way and about that time another torpedo came by and i saw the big red ball and i realized it was the japanese who were attacking pearl harbor. heather: he has helped id nine service members and has the names of one hundred more men that he believes are identifiable. because of his work more than 300 gravestones at the national cemetery in hawaii have been relabeled with the names of the diseased. jon: new information on the earthquake in japan we told you about earlier. minimal damage and minor injuries reported now. the 7.3 magnitude quake striking off the northeastern coast triggering a small tsunami in the same area affected by last year's earthquake disaster. residents are breathing a sigh of re
. on the subject of being on the roads, conservative u.s. senator michael crapo charged with drunken driving after a weekend arrest in washington, d.c. suburb over the weekend. idaho republican who has said he does not drink because of his mormon faith had a blood alcohol content of .11%. he issued apology accepting total responsibility for ips dent. in newtown, connecticut, a resident told reporters christmas will never be the same for the families who lost children and loved ones in the december 14 massacre. correspondent molly henneberg reports both sides of gun debate trying to develop a plan to keep the nation's chirp safe. >> the national rifle association may support plan to put armed officers at the nation's school bus lawmakers are less than enthusiastic about the idea, especially the democrats. dianne feinstein who is expected to introduce gun control legislation in january, called the nra idea "distraction." others suggest it might have the opposite effect on lawmakers. >> well, i think he is so extreme a tone deaf he actually helps the cause of us passing sensible gun legislation in th
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform background checks. you can be a three-time convicted felon, a serial domestic abuser, severely mentally ill, or even on a terrorist watch list and still go to a gun show or go on the internet and buy whatever gun you want. the american people want to strengthen their bases to prevent the mentally ill from buying gun. but over a million disqualifying mental health records are still missing from states. 10 states have failed to flag a single person as mentally ill. and 17 states list less than 100 people. miles per hour people want to see assault weapons bans reinstated and large capacity ammunition clps banned to keep dangerous ammunition out of the hands of mad men. let's face it. when you put a 30-round clip in an assault weapon, you are not protecting your home. you are not hunting deer, you are hunting people. we have hid from this fight for too long. for too long we have used politics and the second amendment to cover up
has looked at a calendar lately, but we are about out of time here, folks. the u.s. economy is at stake. million upon millions of families are counting on us to do something. it is tte president's job, it is his job, to find a solution that can pass the congress. he is the only one that can do it. this is not john boehner's problem to solve. he has done his part. mr. president, how about rallying your party around a solution. how about getting democrats to support something. we simply cannot solve the problem we face unless and until the president of the united states either signs no will or develops the ability, the ability, to lead. this is a moment that calls for presidential leadership. that is the way out of this. it is that simple. does anyone wonder why we keep going from crisis to crisis around here? anybody that is a pattern? this should not be a crisis. this is an opportunity. the president again ignored it. as i said yesterday, i think it is obvious at this point that the president wants to go off the cliff. i know most of the american people do not want that. tod
information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors. we are joined by richard ruth, a professor at the naval academy. professor, what do you teach? >> predominantly asian history, and offer courses in thailand and vietnam. >> host: why important for students to know southeast asian history? >> guest: the united states is very much engaged in that corner of the world that we have many allies there. we have many partners we are working with, and many students at the naval academy, shipmen who will be officers who are going to southeast asia and remitting our interests there. i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the cultures and have knowledge of the history. >> host: well, professor ruth, a long time ally is thailand, and you wrote a book called "in buddhist company: thai soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thai land was a close ally to the united states in the vietnam war, and those familiar with
story we are following as we learn of the pass aifg decorated u.s. general. >> general norman schwarzkopf passed away yesterday after battling pneumonia. we have a report. -- the passing of a decorated u.s. general. >> reporter: the commander of u.s. led international coalition forces that drove shad out of kuwait in 1991 has died. general schwarzkopf was a much- decorated combat soldier in vietnam and was possibly known as stormin' norman. former president bush approved the following statement. statem >> in the late '80s, general schwarzkopf was promossed to general and later appointed commander in chief of the u.s. central command. general colin powell released this statement which read in part, with the passing of general h. norman schwarzkopf, america lost a great patriot. general schwarzkopf was 78 years old. >>> the white house released this statement last night. it says, with the passing of general norman schwarzkopf we lost and merge original. from his deckated service in vietnam to the historic liberation of kuwait and his leadership of the united states general comm
the markets pull back more to crystallize what this could mean for the u.s. economy to members of congress. we didn't see that. it is a numbers game though in terms of what will happen. we know need 60 votes to clear a fill buster in the senate. seven republicans need to go along a lot of jockeying that needs to be done, even if we have a deal put forth. >> interesting what the market is pricing in. we thought the market wanted a grand deal. clearly, dennis you willing to put up with a band-aid. >> i have been surprised how static it has been, the stock and the bond markets, carl. i think the market, i think, has internalized that idea we are just going to shuffle along for a period, the beginning of january. then for another six to nine months. the bigger question really becomes beyond the equity market in particular, becomes the real functioning economy of this country. we are going to be stuck again. we went through sandy, that was a natural disaster, to think that all this really is man made, still boggles the mind. >> sickening. especially with claims back to 350, decent number this morni
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
on the ground in benghazi and it cites at least 20 specific security related events. it also says the u.s. embassy in tripoli led by ambassador chris stevens should have taken a more active or stronger role to advocate for security at the consulate. it also indicates that it was the ambassador's decision to travel to eastern libya, to benghazi on september 11th and that he was aware of the anniversary. the report states, his status as leading u.s. government advocate on libya policy and his expertise on benghazi in particular caused washington to give unusual deference to his judgment. while the report concludes that there were systemic failures at senior levels of the state department, significantly it does not make any formal recommendations for discipline airy action, bill. bill: what else should we know that's in there, catherine? >> reporter: well the missing piece really, and this is the critical policy piece, is why it was that the obama administration specifically, the secretary of state, advocated for this light footprint on the ground in benghazi when the intelligence seemed to
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
powerful machines and he wins every election. he gets to the u.s. senate, he climbs the leadership ladder and defeats prominent liberal senators. he selected the senate whip by ousting ted kennedy. he defeated former vice president of the united states, hubert. it is always a fight for byrd. had to fight for everything he got for west virginia. he had to fight. the trouble is, what direction to take the book in? how to convey these two objectives? it came to me while sitting on the senate floor when he delivered his speech. to celebrate his 50 years of senate and the u.s. senate. the floor staff asked us to wait a few minutes since the senators were on their way there. they wanted to hear byrd talk. we discussed these incidents. he kept relating to the presidency. i worked with this president. he worked with jimmy carter. it started dawning on me -- the presidents. after the speech, it dawned on me -- no other person in american history has had an impact on so many presidential administrations. he has impacted 11 presidents. and that is 1/4 of presidents in american history. i could achie
>> for state department officials resigned after reports for lack of security at the u.s. benghazi, libya. wittiest ambassador and three other americans were killed. at 8 a.m. eastern the senate foreign relations committee, we will have that on c-span2. later in the day, we will head over to the house side of the capitol. we have live coverage at 1 p.m. eastern here on c-span3. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every of them appear, probably will never happen again in history. it's interesting because after dad was sworn in we went in and took a picture, photo of the family behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexander virginia, suburbia, munich, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we been living there. dad was vice president. i've never forget that night mom was co
minutes that legislators have been mentioned and people have mentioned various talk show host. u.s. a call at 202-585-3881 for republicans -- give us a call. 202-585-3880 for democrats. you can send us a tweet, twitter.com/cspanwj. facebook, as well, facebook.com/cspan. journal@c-span.org. this is lee in wyoming. host: give us a call and let us know who your political hero is. the story after the new ttown shooting. this is the front page of "the new york times." host: the story goes on. this is luke rosak. host: it goes on to talk about that story. front page of "the new york daily news." this stemming from upstate new york about a sniper that set fire to a building and goes on to shoot two firemen as they were trying to take care of the fire. eric from pittsburgh, pennsylvania on the democrat's line. good morning. caller: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it wa
engulfed u.n. ambassador to the u.s. susan rice, who had been tipped as early favorite, really, for that job. but today senator john kerry's endorsement was made official. president obama nominating kerry for one of the highest posts really in the world. >> i'm very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role as the son of a foreign service officer. he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. the role they play in advancing our interests and values, the risks that they undertake and the sacrifices that they make along with their families. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. john, i'm very grateful that you've agreed to take on this new assignment. i'm confident the senate will confirm you quickly. >> we know john kerry is a veteran senator. we know he ran for president in 2004. cnn's kate bolduan looks at the man in the moment. >> thank you very much, m
to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, congressional leaders will meet with the president this afternoon. i remember standing on the white house north lawn last month, after leaders met with the president back then. things looked pretty promising. here's what they said after that meeting. >> i believe that the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> i feel confident that a solution may be in sight. >> it was a constructive meeting. we all understand where we are. >> we feel very comfortable with each other and this isn't something we're going to wait until the last day of december to get it done. >> isn't that special? now we're in the last days of december. and with just three days to go, the rhetoric has changed in the beltway. these are the latest comments. >> republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward, just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the
-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but we have a big sweep because we could couple this with the showtime documentary to make it more dramatic. >> just like a basic text history 101. these books are not coherent. there is no pattern. we don't understand how that works. to some degree the united states always comes out ahead or okay. >> if you take if the chinese history. >> to see it through the other rise in? >> but he said with gap what we said looks to the russians obamacare has some of that ability. >> talk about obama. your chapter is entitled provocatively. [laughter] in some ways they've made it worse. >> the longest chapter of the book. >> it might get longer. >> then i see the cuts that we have to make but to deal with a contemporary is a lot of interest in obama. then to pull back. >> but there were people on the right to and those who would disagre
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
, a very effective part of the team. >> susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. as seen as potentially the top pick for that post and you have john kerry who has wanted it for quite some time. how did they manage to finesse that? >> reporter: well, i would put it this way, my reporting is that there were two people being considered for the post, two people being vetted and they were susan rice and senator kerry and the president was, as you know, fiercely defensive of her once she came under attack and didn't want her name or her record to be tarnished in any way. as soon as that became -- it mushroomed on the hill and that became too much of an obstacle and an overwhelming challenge and once she withdrew her name it was very clear that it was only john kerry. senator kerry has been a foregone conclusion since she withdrew her name last week and it was just a matter of time until the president made this announcement, suzanne. >> finally, massachusetts, of course, the senate seat there. it looks like republicans really wanted to see john kerry as the potential pick here because they cou
. >> most all of the hangers we buy today are made in vietnam or china. >> reporter: the u.s. commerce department says vietnam and china have flooded the market forcing nearly all u.s. manufacturers out of business. so the feds slapped a 187% tariff on the imported hangers. more than doubling the cost to dry cleaners. >> that certainly drove the price of hangers up. we were paying probably 4 to 5 cents a hanger and now we're paying up to 9 to 10 cents each. >> reporter: the co-owner says customers noticed the price increase. >> customers never like it but as costs go up, supplies, you have to do it. >> reporter: steve and janice say hangers are hardly worth harping about. the real cost increases are from utilities, chemicals and wages. when you run through nearly 10,000 hangers a month, every cent counts and recycling is encouraged. she says if you have hangers hanging around the house hand them back in. that's fewer foreign hangers that have to be purchased. in albany, don ford, cbs 5. >>> important news for people who drive a prius. toyota has agreed to pay some former prius owners a
is not that great. >> you start off your book by saying you want to copy the u.s. grant memoirs, a two volume set. then yours became more emotional than his. how many you did one volume and how many emotional? >> i will tell you why. first of all, grant is an interesting character. he refused to write his memoirs for years and years. finally he went bankrupt once again and found out he was dying and it kind of happened at the same time. he tells us at the front of the memoirs the only reason i'm writing this is because i went bankrupt again and i want to leave an estate for my family and they are offering me money. he is up front about it. >> when did you like him? >> he was a dirty boot soldier. >> when was he a soldier? >> he was a soldier long before the -- long before he was known to the american people as the leader of the union army. he was out doing great things. grant is interesting. he was a success awful a soldier then a failure as a soldier then he was a success at a businessman. he hung in there. he was one of the most effective -- without a lot of press coverage and that sort of thin
into effect. that could take a painful toll on the u.s. economy. let's go to capitol hill. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is standing by with the latest. dana? >> reporter: well, wolf, the vote that the speaker calls plan b is about an hour away. we're told that republican leaders at this hour are still twisting arms, republican arms to make sure that this passes. there's a weird sense here, a weird atmosphere that things are moving fast but stalled at the same time. the fiscal cliff impasse is so surreal, democrats are resorting to movie analogies, calling republicans thelma and louise. >> rather than face the reality of what lies ahead, they hit the gas. that's what we're hearing from speaker boehner now. >> reporter: don't blame us, say the republicans, it's the president. >> he's doing everything within his power to take us over the cliff and he is set on dividing us. >> reporter: adding to the sense that congress is in an alternate universe, instead of negotiating to avert the fiscal cliff, the house will vote on the gop plan b, a bill to keep tax rates in place
holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving fla
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